.
Pelicans Report
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 72

Thread: AD officially listed as day-to-day with adductor strain

  1. #26
    Just don't rush him. Even if it takes a couple of extra games, the bottom of the west doesn't look too strong this year.

  2. #27
    Aaron's All Metro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    New Orleans 9th Ward
    Posts
    2,275
    People got injured in college and now their medical experts
    SIGN A SF

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyman View Post
    They said no structural damage so I'd imagine that means no tear.
    A strain is by definition a tear of the muscle. If he is day to day its likely a grade 1 tear. By structural they likely mean no damage to his hip joint/labrum or avulsion fractures (tendon ripped from the bone).

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    A strain is by definition a tear of the muscle. If he is day to day its likely a grade 1 tear. By structural they likely mean no damage to his hip joint/labrum or avulsion fractures (tendon ripped from the bone).
    Uhh no it isn't. Let's get our definitions right first shall we?

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    A strain is by definition a tear of the muscle. If he is day to day its likely a grade 1 tear. By structural they likely mean no damage to his hip joint/labrum or avulsion fractures (tendon ripped from the bone).
    You are 100% INCORRECT. A strain is stretching the tendon, but not to the point of a tear. As far as Sprains, pending on how you interpret the Grade 1 Definition, I guess you can assume they or saying SPRAIN or TEAR as interchangeable . A sprain & Strain affect entirely different body parts .You Sprain an ankle. You strain tendons.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Bricklayer View Post
    Look, it's irrelevant who has had what injury. I've personally done rotator cuff, separated shoulder, torn elbow ligaments, torn thumb ligaments, torn ankle ligaments, broken jaw, fingers and arm...but if any NBA training staff examined a player who appeared to have one of those things happen to them, and then announced that player would be "day to day", my own experience with the injuries would not be relevant. What is relevant is the "day to day" prognosis. I've been watching the NBA for decades, and not once in all those years can I recall a "day to day" announcement preceding a player missing a month or more straight of action. Especially with soft tissue injuries, there are numerous different severities. If this was a significant tear, they wouldn't list it day to day, they'd know he was definitely going to be out for some period of weeks at least, and give a general range.
    So, you give more credence to an inept Saints-Pels medical crews assessment than you do to the repetitive conclusions of what an adductor strain timetable is? Huh

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Tinman View Post
    So, you give more credence to an inept Saints-Pels medical crews assessment than you do to the repetitive conclusions of what an adductor strain timetable is? Huh
    The people who were inept have been fired. AD had two evaluations, one done by doctors not from the Pels medical staff in Portland and then again when he got back to New Orleans.

    The conclusion by both were the same, that it was a day to day injury.

    So in short, Yes, everyone should trust what the doctors who have actually seen and evaluated the injury have to say instead of people who have not.

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythrol View Post
    The people who were inept have been fired. AD had two evaluations, one done by doctors not from the Pels medical staff in Portland and then again when he got back to New Orleans.

    The conclusion by both were the same, that it was a day to day injury.

    So in short, Yes, everyone should trust what the doctors who have actually seen and evaluated the injury have to say instead of people who have not.
    I'm pretty sure the Pels diagnosis went something like 'Whatever the guys before us said'

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by AusPel View Post
    I'm pretty sure the Pels diagnosis went something like 'Whatever the guys before us said'
    I don't believe you actually believe that.

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythrol View Post
    I don't believe you actually believe that.
    Nope. I really think this


  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyman View Post
    Uhh no it isn't. Let's get our definitions right first shall we?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tinman View Post
    You are 100% INCORRECT. A strain is stretching the tendon, but not to the point of a tear. As far as Sprains, pending on how you interpret the Grade 1 Definition, I guess you can assume they or saying SPRAIN or TEAR as interchangeable . A sprain & Strain affect entirely different body parts .You Sprain an ankle. You strain tendons.
    "A strain is when a muscle is stretched too much and tears. It is also called a pulled muscle. A strain is a painful injury. It can be caused by an accident, overusing a muscle, or using a muscle in the wrong way."

    https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000042.htm

    "Sprains are tears in ligaments; strains are tears in muscles. Tears (ruptures) may also occur in tendons."

    "Pathophysiology
    Sprains and strains
    Tears in ligaments or muscles may be graded as

    1st degree: Minimal (fibers are stretched but intact, or only a few fibers are torn)

    2nd degree: Partial (some to almost all fibers are torn)

    3rd degree: Complete (all fibers are torn)"

    http://www.merckmanuals.com/professi...issue-injuries

    As a rule, all strains are tears in muscle fibers because muscles can stretch normally, including tendons. Sprains are not all tears of ligaments because ligaments do not normally stretch, so they can stretch without tearing and still cause pain. (This would also result in instability of the affected joint.)

    Edited to add: 5 years in practice tell's me my definitions are correct
    Last edited by P_B_&_G; 12-06-2017 at 02:41 PM.

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythrol View Post
    The people who were inept have been fired. AD had two evaluations, one done by doctors not from the Pels medical staff in Portland and then again when he got back to New Orleans.

    The conclusion by both were the same, that it was a day to day injury.

    So in short, Yes, everyone should trust what the doctors who have actually seen and evaluated the injury have to say instead of people who have not.
    I'm not arguing with you but Misty Suri was fired from the Saints and is still the head of orthopedics for the Pels. Just saying...

  13. #38


    "Adductor Strain"

    "Background
    An adductor (groin) strain is a common problem among many individuals who are physically active, especially in competitive sports. The most common sports that put athletes at risk for adductor strains are football, soccer, hockey, basketball, tennis, figure skating, baseball, horseback riding, karate, and softball. [1]

    Hip adductor injuries occur most commonly when there is a forced push-off (side-to-side motion). High forces occur in the adductor tendons when the athlete must shift direction suddenly in the opposite direction. As a result, the adductor muscles contract to generate opposing forces."

    https://emedicine.medscape.com/artic...08-overview#a2

    Google is your friend...

  14. #39
    Weird that Booker just went out with the same adductor strain injury. Before all this, I'd never heard of an adductor.

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    I'm not arguing with you but Misty Suri was fired from the Saints and is still the head of orthopedics for the Pels. Just saying...
    He was only an assistant for the Saints. At least one of the players who dealt with them from his injury specifically said he had no problem with Suri because he was just doing what he was told to do by the other doctor.

    There is a reason he was promoted by the Pels earlier this year and not fired.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythrol View Post
    He was only an assistant for the Saints. At least one of the players who dealt with them from his injury specifically said he had no problem with Suri because he was just doing what he was told to do by the other doctor.

    There is a reason he was promoted by the Pels earlier this year and not fired.
    Yeah, I can only assume he was retained because he is doing his job well.

  17. #42
    All-Star Rel11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    In The Playoffs
    Posts
    417
    Quote Originally Posted by Rheem654 View Post
    Weird that Booker just went out with the same adductor strain injury. Before all this, I'd never heard of an adductor.
    I just watched the clip. He was frozen in the middle of the court. I’m surprised he was able to stand. Sad to see.
    RIP HunnyB/FlyGirl

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    "A strain is when a muscle is stretched too much and tears. It is also called a pulled muscle. A strain is a painful injury. It can be caused by an accident, overusing a muscle, or using a muscle in the wrong way."

    https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000042.htm

    "Sprains are tears in ligaments; strains are tears in muscles. Tears (ruptures) may also occur in tendons."

    "Pathophysiology
    Sprains and strains
    Tears in ligaments or muscles may be graded as

    1st degree: Minimal (fibers are stretched but intact, or only a few fibers are torn)

    2nd degree: Partial (some to almost all fibers are torn)

    3rd degree: Complete (all fibers are torn)"

    http://www.merckmanuals.com/professi...issue-injuries

    As a rule, all strains are tears in muscle fibers because muscles can stretch normally, including tendons. Sprains are not all tears of ligaments because ligaments do not normally stretch, so they can stretch without tearing and still cause pain. (This would also result in instability of the affected joint.)

    Edited to add: 5 years in practice tell's me my definitions are correct
    No, they aren't. Your own definitions say so. You said it's a tear. No, it is not always since there are different degrees. Hence the 1st degree in the very definition you googled up. It is a stretching OR tearing depending on degree. Again, since ADs diagnosis said no structural damage, you'd have to assume it was just a bad pull (stretching).

    Every definition you can find describes it as such.

    A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments — the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints. The most common location for a sprain is in your ankle.

    A strain is a stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon. A tendon is a fibrous cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones. Strains often occur in the lower back and in the hamstring muscle in the back of your thigh.
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20377938

    This explains why he was listed as day-to-day and might be back as early as Sunday. You don't come back from a torn muscle in 1 week.

  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyman View Post
    No, they aren't. Your own definitions say so. You said it's a tear. No, it is not always since there are different degrees. Hence the 1st degree in the very definition you googled up. It is a stretching OR tearing depending on degree. Again, since ADs diagnosis said no structural damage, you'd have to assume it was just a bad pull (stretching).

    Every definition you can find describes it as such.



    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20377938

    This explains why he was listed as day-to-day and might be back as early as Sunday. You don't come back from a torn muscle in 1 week.
    Sorry, but you are wrong. All strains are tears of sarcomeres. In all of the definitions that are meant for laymen they lump strain and sprain together. Muscles can stretch without tearing, if they stretch too far they tear and are defined as strained, a minimal amount of torn fibers are grade 1 strains. Ligaments cannot stretch without intrinsically being damaged, thus the grade 1 sprain that can be a tear or stretching without a tear. You don't have to believe me but that doesn't change the facts.

    Now, some more reading for you in case you still don't believe me.

    "Muscle Damage and the Bodyís Response

    Muscle injuries occur when the force in the muscle is so great that the tissue begins to tear. This can occur within the muscle itself, where the tendon attaches to the bone, or most commonly, at the junction between the muscle and tendon.

    When muscle is initially injured, significant inflammation and swelling occurs. Following the inflammatory phase, muscle begins to heal by regenerating muscle fibers from stem cells that live around the area of injury. However, a significant amount of scar tissue also forms where the muscle was injured. Over time, this scar tissue remodels, but the muscle never fully regenerates. This is thought to make muscle prone to a subsequent injury."

    "Grade 1: Mild damage to individual muscle fibers (less than 5% of fibers) that causes minimal loss of strength and motion. These injuries generally take about 2-3 weeks to improve."

    https://www.hss.edu/conditions_muscl...s-overview.asp

  20. #45
    Alright "doc". You win the Internet.

  21. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    Sorry, but you are wrong. All strains are tears of sarcomeres. In all of the definitions that are meant for laymen they lump strain and sprain together. Muscles can stretch without tearing, if they stretch too far they tear and are defined as strained, a minimal amount of torn fibers are grade 1 strains. Ligaments cannot stretch without intrinsically being damaged, thus the grade 1 sprain that can be a tear or stretching without a tear. You don't have to believe me but that doesn't change the facts.

    Now, some more reading for you in case you still don't believe me.

    "Muscle Damage and the Bodyís Response

    Muscle injuries occur when the force in the muscle is so great that the tissue begins to tear. This can occur within the muscle itself, where the tendon attaches to the bone, or most commonly, at the junction between the muscle and tendon.

    When muscle is initially injured, significant inflammation and swelling occurs. Following the inflammatory phase, muscle begins to heal by regenerating muscle fibers from stem cells that live around the area of injury. However, a significant amount of scar tissue also forms where the muscle was injured. Over time, this scar tissue remodels, but the muscle never fully regenerates. This is thought to make muscle prone to a subsequent injury."

    "Grade 1: Mild damage to individual muscle fibers (less than 5% of fibers) that causes minimal loss of strength and motion. These injuries generally take about 2-3 weeks to improve."

    https://www.hss.edu/conditions_muscl...s-overview.asp
    AD will likely be out for several weeks. This is a bad time to get injured due to our schedule. This injury really concerns me because the risk or it recurring is high. Itís unlikely that they could misdiagnose this correct?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyman View Post
    Alright "doc". You win the Internet.
    Not trying to win anything. i simply responded to this...

    Quote Originally Posted by luckyman View Post
    Uhh no it isn't. Let's get our definitions right first shall we?
    Just attempting to get our definitions straight. So...


  23. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by pelicanchamp View Post
    AD will likely be out for several weeks. This is a bad time to get injured due to our schedule. This injury really concerns me because the risk or it recurring is high. It’s unlikely that they could misdiagnose this correct?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Not necessarily, the 2-3 week time frame is an average of recovery time for normal humans. Elite athletes tend to heal faster and also get constant treatment that expedites the healing process by controlling inflammation and encouraging tissue repair. Day-to-day is just that, he could be ready to go any day.

  24. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post


    "Adductor Strain"

    "Background
    An adductor (groin) strain is a common problem among many individuals who are physically active, especially in competitive sports. The most common sports that put athletes at risk for adductor strains are football, soccer, hockey, basketball, tennis, figure skating, baseball, horseback riding, karate, and softball. [1]

    Hip adductor injuries occur most commonly when there is a forced push-off (side-to-side motion). High forces occur in the adductor tendons when the athlete must shift direction suddenly in the opposite direction. As a result, the adductor muscles contract to generate opposing forces."

    https://emedicine.medscape.com/artic...08-overview#a2

    Google is your friend...
    Lol- that's the very 1st Google definition. Move on, please. You truly don't know what you don't know.

  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by P_B_&_G View Post
    Sorry, but you are wrong. All strains are tears of sarcomeres. In all of the definitions that are meant for laymen they lump strain and sprain together. Muscles can stretch without tearing, if they stretch too far they tear and are defined as strained, a minimal amount of torn fibers are grade 1 strains. Ligaments cannot stretch without intrinsically being damaged, thus the grade 1 sprain that can be a tear or stretching without a tear. You don't have to believe me but that doesn't change the facts.

    Now, some more reading for you in case you still don't believe me.

    "Muscle Damage and the Body’s Response

    Muscle injuries occur when the force in the muscle is so great that the tissue begins to tear. This can occur within the muscle itself, where the tendon attaches to the bone, or most commonly, at the junction between the muscle and tendon.

    When muscle is initially injured, significant inflammation and swelling occurs. Following the inflammatory phase, muscle begins to heal by regenerating muscle fibers from stem cells that live around the area of injury. However, a significant amount of scar tissue also forms where the muscle was injured. Over time, this scar tissue remodels, but the muscle never fully regenerates. This is thought to make muscle prone to a subsequent injury."

    "Grade 1: Mild damage to individual muscle fibers (less than 5% of fibers) that causes minimal loss of strength and motion. These injuries generally take about 2-3 weeks to improve."

    https://www.hss.edu/conditions_muscl...s-overview.asp
    Quote Originally Posted by Tinman View Post
    Lol- that's the very 1st Google definition. Move on, please. You truly don't know what you don't know.
    So, apparently you skipped the post above that goes into detail about why all strains are tears. Muscle can stretch and when it cannot stretch any farther it tears and is called a strain. You sir, can move on if you think you know something that you are clearly misinformed about. If you would like to explain to me why I am wrong feel free to try. I will be waiting...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •